AAC – Tropes multimodaux dans les discours contemporains, Lyon 3, 19-21.05.22

Le projet transversal « Discours métaphoriques et corpus » du Centre d’Études Linguistiques – Corpus, Discours et Sociétés de l’Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 organise un colloque international « Multimodal Tropes in Contemporary Corpora » / « Les tropes multimodaux dans les discours contemporains » à Lyon, les 19, 20 et 21 mai 2022. L’invité d’honneur sera le Professeur Charles Forceville, de l’Université d’Amsterdam, spécialiste reconnu de la multimodalité.

L’appel à communications en français et en anglais est disponible sur le site du colloque : https://multimod-tropes.sciencesconf.org/

Dates clés :

  • 15 octobre 2021 : date limite de soumission des résumés et des mots-clés (1500-3000 caractères, espaces compris, bibliographie sélectionnée non incluse).
  • Fin novembre 2021 : notification de l’acceptation par le comité scientifique

Les soumissions se font par le biais de l’interface sciencesconf (nécessité de se créer un compte, procédure rapide et gratuite).

En cas de problème, n’hésitez pas à nous contacter via le formulaire de « contact » de notre site.

Bel été !

Le comité d’organisation du colloque

Coordination

Denis JAMET, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 & University of Arizona

Bérengère LAFIANDRA, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Adeline TERRY, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Organisation

Olga ARTYUSHKINA, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Christophe COUPE, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Marion DEL BOVE, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Lucia GOMEZ, Université Grenoble Alpes

Aurélie HEOIS, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Germain IVANOFF-TRINADTZATY, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Philippe MILLOT, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Pauline RODET, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

Imen SEGHIR, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

CFP – Political Discourse: New Approaches to New Challenges? – en ligne, Bordeaux, 7-8.03.2022

Political Discourse: New Approaches to New Challenges?

Online conference organised by The University of Lorraine (Nancy) and Bordeaux Montaigne University – Monday 7th March and Tuesday 8th March 2022

(deadline (see below): 1st October 2021

(…) What does the use of language in contexts we call ‘political’ tell us about humans in general? (Chilton 2004)

Political discourse is at a crossroads. Faced with an increasing number of challenges, it is said by some researchers to have reached a state of crisis (Wodak 2011; Ekström and Firmstone 2017). The challenges it faces take many different forms. In the case of the relationships between politicians and the public, and even politicians and journalists, this state of crisis has already been reached (Ekström and Firmstone 2017). Political systems are facing new, unprecedented challenges to their everyday functioning and, in some cases, to their very survival. These challenges have come from a variety of sources. Externally, they are the corollary of globalisation (including access to global media outlets, alleged interference from other states and institutions, and international conflict). Internally, political institutions face competition from populist waves (Wodak 2015), social media and fake news, all of which are capable of crossing international borders. What accounts for these challenges?

Firstly, information from official sources, such as political institutions and official documents, constitutes reliable sources of shared knowledge (van Dijk 2011), while specialised, technical discourse may become recontextualised by journalists as a form of “popularizing discourse” that is “based on general, common knowledge, occasionally enriched by a few technical terms” (van Dijk 2014: 135). The legitimation of political discourse requires not only the politician’s presence in the media, but also the ability to demonstrate what makes them different in order to ultimately add to the originality of their political creed (Ben Hamed and Mayaffre 2015). However, growing dissatisfaction in society has resulted in a vicious circle: “because so many people are dissatisfied with politics they turn to fiction. Because the real world of politics can never compete with its idealized version, the fiction necessarily reinforces this dissatisfaction” (Wodak 2011: 206). As Coulomb-Gully and Esquenazi (2012: 7) argue, storytelling and scripting techniques have resulted in a new political reality which has scrambled the boundaries between genres. Yet politicians and the media depend on each other for the dissemination of political programmes and access to political information respectively, the absence of which can give rise to speculation and rumours (Wodak 2011: 19-21). Moreover, those on the fringes of power are turning to rumours for their sources of information (Rouquette and Boyer 2010). Fiction has increasingly become a prevalent form of political discourse and has given rise to new epistemological challenges to the sources of information: fake news and the fascination for scandals. Since the turn of the millennium, specific examples include ‘politically authentic mediatised fiction’ as in the case of a broadcast in Belgium on 13th December 2006 (Provenzano 2012: 26), while claims of fake news by and against the Trump administration in the United States and allegations of fake news in the Brexit referendum represent a more general trend towards fiction and rumours in politics. As an illustration, in 2012, Trump’s climate sceptic narrative was based on the fact that climate change did not exist and was a “hoax”[1] “invented by the Chinese”, a conspiracy to weaken America’s economy. He then denied this statement four years later, during one of the presidential debates. However, when President Trump decided to exit the Paris accord in June 2017, he stated that the conspiracy against the United States was actually global[2]. And before the mid-term elections, his eco-narrative was altered once more: the climate is changing, but this change is not “man-made”[3].

Consequently, according to Provenzano (2012), analysing what constitutes ‘telling the truth’ requires new methods.Are new tools required for the analysis of new issues in political discourse? Do existing tools need updating?

Secondly, and in conjunction with the questioning of the reliability of information sources, new forms of media, in particular social media, have become a powerful alternative device in political communication (Montgomery 2017). They have provided a new platform for populism and the rise of populist leaders (Mazzoleni and Bracciale 2018). Facebook has provided new opportunities for the creation of a political domain within which leaders can reach out to voters, as one recent study in Italy shows (Mazzoleni and Bracciale 2018). Does the proliferation of the media used in political communication pose new challenges for the political genre as a whole? Are the ‘official’ sources of political discourse now shifting towards new media? If the latter is true, should Critical Discourse Studies (CDS) consider such sources of information and discourse to be as significant for research purposes as the more ‘traditional’ sources?

Thirdly, the professional training of politicians to deal with the media in the face of the gap between the expectations of the public and what politicians actually deliver has long been identified (Fairclough 1995). More recently, some of their approaches appear on the surface to correspond to a different kind of professionalism, implying new and original techniques to score political points. Take, for instance, the use of impoliteness as a rhetorical strategy by anti-establishment politicians in Spain (Garrido Ardila 2019), or the use of irony and sarcasm in metaphors used during the debate on Brexit (Musolff 2017). What now seems to be the case is that politicians have discovered new ways to disguise that gap. The question is whether the proliferation of political strategies requires a proliferation of analytical techniques to identify and discern those strategies.

New phenomena, new media and new strategies have come into the spotlight and have raised new questions. Yet answers in the form of new methods appear to be within sight. While computer-assisted methods have been available and used for many years (see, for example, Triandafyllidou 1993), it has become possible to adopt increasingly practical quantitative approaches to political discourse analysis. Information technology has made it possible to use automated approaches to take contextual factors into account (Bilbao-Jayo and Almeida 2018), while innovative approaches using vector methods make the ‘political footprint’ easier to trace (Bruchansky 2017). Moreover, CDS is increasingly able to take advantage of methods in cognitive linguistics to explore previously untouched areas of world-view ideologies and narratives through Proximization Theory (Cap 2013, 2017). Such innovative approaches not only use automation optimally in CDS but can also be of use to public administrative bodies (Bilbao-Jayo and Almeida 2018).

These challenges to the established forms of political discourse have given rise to the proliferation of what constitutes ‘political discourse’, and indeed what methods and tools are most appropriate for the analysis of it. Consequently, the conference is open to the analysis of political discourse in any part of the world. We welcome abstracts that address one of the following themes in relation to political discourse:

–               innovative approaches in CDS dealing with bespoke problems;

–               cognitive linguistic approaches to political discourse analysis, more specifically including political metaphor analysis (Musolff 2016) and critical metaphor analysis (Charteris-Black 2013);

–               pragmatics-based approaches;

–               approaches to the concept of rhetoric (Charteris-Black 2013);

–               a multimodal analysis of political discourse (including gesture analysis);

–               orality in audio/audio-visual corpora;

–               corpus-based approaches;

–               approaches which focus on the nature of official or unofficial sources of information;

–               the discourse of official institutions;

–               mediated political discourse;

–               epistemological considerations in political discourse and access to information;

–               comparative linguistic studies not limited to one language or one political system;

–               the effects of globalisation and the ‘global arena’ (Chilton 2004) on political discourse;

–               the influence of the language of ideology on current political thought;

–               the language of climate change;

–               the language of populism;

–               the didactic applications of political language including, for example, the professional training of politicians;

–               cultural and anthropological considerations in translation and interpretation.

Other research themes will be considered on merit, and special consideration will be given to abstracts that privilege an interdisciplinary approach to political discourse analysis. We therefore welcome contributions from scholars working on political discourse from other disciplines.

References

Ben Hamed, M. and Mayaffre, D. (2015) ‘Les thèmes du discours. Du concept à la méthode.’ Mots, N° 108, pp. 5-13. http://journals.openedition.org/mots/21975.

Bilbao-Jayo, A. and Almeida, A. (2018) ‘Automatic political discourse analysis with multi-scale convolutional neural networks and contextual data.’ International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks, Vol. 14 N° 11, pp. 1-11.

Bruchansky, C. (2017) ‘Political Footprints: Political Discourse Analysis using Pre-Trained Word Vectors.’ Cornell University: arXiv:1705.06353v1 [cs.CL]

Cap, P. (2013) Proximization. The Pragmatics of Symbolic Distance Crossing. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

——. (2017) ‘Studying ideological worldviews in political Discourse Space: Critical-cognitive advances in the analysis of conflict and coercion.’ Journal of Pragmatics, N° 108, pp. 17-27.

Charteris-Black, J. (2013, 2018) Analysing Political Speeches. Rhetoric, Discourse and Metaphor. Palgrave MacMillan.

Chilton, P. (2004) Analysing Political Discourse. Theory and Practice. Routledge.

Coulomb-Gully, M. and Esquenazi, J-P. (2012) ‘Fiction et politique : doubles jeux.’ Mots, N° 99, pp. 5-11. http://journals.openedition.org/mots/20680.

Ekström, M. and Firmstone, J. (2017) The Mediated Politics of Europe: A Comparative Study of Discourse. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Fairclough, N. (1995) Media Discourse. London: Edward Arnold.

Garrido Ardila, J.A. (2019) ‘Impoliteness as a rhetorical strategy in Spain’s politics.’ Journal of Pragmatics, N° 140, pp. 160-170.

Mazzoleni, G. and Bracciale, R. (2018) ‘Socially mediated populism: the communicative strategies of political leaders on Facebook.’ Palgrave Communications, Vol. 50 N° 4, pp. 1-10.

Montgomery, M. (2017) ‘Post-truth Politics? Authenticity, populism and the electoral discourses of Donald Trump.’ Journal of Language and Politics, Vol. 16 N° 4, pp. 619-639.

Musolff, A. (2016) Political Metaphor Analysis. Discourse and Scenarios. Bloomsbury.

——. (2017) ‘Metaphor, irony and sarcasm in public discourse.’ Journal of Pragmatics, N° 109, pp. 95-104.

Provenzano, F. (2012) ‘La politique de la fiction d’actualité. L’argumentation par émersion dans le faux journal télévisé de la RTBF.’ Mots, N° 99, pp. 13-27.http://journals.openedition.org/mots/20683.

Rouquette, M-L. and Boyer, H. (2010) ‘Citoyens et politiques pensées. Les récits de rumeur.’ Mots, N° 92, pp. 5-10. http://journals.openedition.org/mots/19416.

Triandafyllidou, A. (1993) ‘From qualitative to quantitative analysis in political discourse: a computer-assisted application.’ European University Institute.

Wodak, R. (2011) The Discourse of Politics in Action: Politics as Usual. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

——. (2015) The Politics of Fear. What Right-Wing Populist Discourses Mean. Sage.

Van Dijk, T.A. (2011) ‘Discourse, knowledge, power and politics: Towards critical epistemic discourse analysis.” In Hart, C. (ed.) Critical Discourse Studies in Context and Cognition. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 27-63.

——. (2014) Discourse and Knowledge: A Sociocognitive Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Keynote speakers

Paul Chilton, Emeritus Professor and Associate Fellow, Centre for Applied Linguistics, University of Warwick

Andreas Musolff, Professor of Intercultural Communication, School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies, University of East Anglia

Call for papers

We invite participants to submit an abstract of not more than 350 words plus bibliography in English or French. All papers must be given in English or French. Each paper will be allocated 20 minutes plus 10 minutes for questions. All abstracts must be submitted in two Word formats, one anonymised, the other containing the name(s), affiliation(s) and email address(es) of the author(s) in addition to the title of the paper. All abstracts will be reviewed by the scientific committee. The deadline for submissions is Friday 1st October 2021. Please send all submissions with the subjectNANC 2022 to:

–                      Stéphanie Bonnefille stephanie.bonnefille@u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr

–                      and Robert Butler robert.butler@univ-lorraine.fr

Decisions will be communicated by email by Monday 18th October 2021. The scientific committee reserves the right to request modifications to the abstract as a condition of acceptance.

All those who present their work at the conference will be invited to submit an article which will be considered for publication.

Scientific committee

Jean Albrespit, Professor of Linguistics, Bordeaux Montaigne University

Stéphanie Bonnefille, Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Bordeaux Montaigne University

Robert Butler, Senior Lecturer in Linguistics, University of Lorraine (Nancy)

Piotr Cap, Professor of Linguistics, Institute of English, University of Łódź

Catherine Delesse, Professor of Linguistics, University of Lorraine (Nancy)

Isabelle Gaudy-Campbell, Professor of Linguistics, University of Lorraine (Metz)

Simon Harrison, Assistant Professor of Linguistics and Gesture, City University of Hong Kong

Christelle Lacassain-Lagoin, Reader in Linguistics, Paris Sorbonne University

Juana I. Marín-Arrese, Professor of English Linguistics, Complutense University of Madrid

Jane Mulderrig, Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics, University of Sheffield

Laurent Rouveyrol, Reader in Linguistics, University of Côte d’Azur

Francisco José Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñez, Professor of Linguistics, University of La Rioja

Paul Sambre, Assistant Professor of Discourse Studies and Italian Linguistics, KU Leuven

Elise Stickles, Assistant Professor of Language, University of British Columbia

Registration

As the conference is online, specific details will be provided at a later stage. A registration fee will be required and a website specifically for the conference will be available shortly.

AAC – JE La ‘’force grise’’ dans les discours publicitaires marchands et non marchands [vieillissement] – Lyon 3, 9-10.12.21

Le délai pour envoyer une proposition de communication à la journée d’étude qui se déroulera à l’Université de Lyon (Jean Moulin Lyon 3) les jeudi 9 et vendredi 10 décembre 2021 est repoussé au 31 août 2021.

Texte de cadrage

Cette journée d’étude propose de s’interroger sur la société face au vieillissement de sa population lorsqu’elle produit des messages publicitaires qui s’inscrivent dans des stratégies marketing et/ou de communication publique. Cette interrogation, qui porte sur une problématique majeure du XXIe siècle dans les pays occidentaux, constitue la troisième édition d’une série de rencontres scientifiques traitant du discours publicitaire, fruits d’une collaboration entre le Centre d’Études Linguistiques – Corpus, Discours et Sociétés de l’Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 et l’Équipe de recherche de Lyon en sciences de l’Information et de la COmmunication de l’Université Jean Monnet Saint-Etienne. Après avoir abordé « La force argumentative dans le discours de spécialité du marketing : approches multimodales » (Lyon, 14 novembre 2019) et le « Discours de publicité : la figure de l’utilisateur/consommateur au cœur des stratégies énonciatives » (Saint-Etienne, 13 novembre 2020), il s’agit désormais, pour cette édition 2021, de conduire des recherches sur « la ‘force grise’ dans le discours publicitaire marchand et non marchand et sur la société face à ses représentations du vieillissement ».

Le vieillissement de la population est en effet un enjeu majeur auquel les sociétés hypermodernes (Lipovetsky (2004)) doivent faire face. En France en 2020, les 65 ans et plus représentaient 20,5% de la population, contre 19,7% en 2018 (selon l’INSEE). Aujourd’hui, près d’1 Français sur 10 a plus de 75 ans. Selon les projections démographiques de l’Institut, en 2040, 1 Français sur 4 devrait avoir plus de 65 ans et en 2070 cette tranche d’âge pourrait représenter 28,7% de la population du pays. Cette tendance n’est certes pas spécifique à la France. Au Royaume-Uni par exemple, en 2018, les plus de 65 ans représentaient 18% de la population contre 10,8% en 1950 (National Statistics). Et les démographes britanniques estiment qu’en 2030, 1 Britannique sur 5 aura plus de 65 ans, et qu’en 2066, 7% de la population aura plus de 85 ans (AgeUK). Ces statistiques illustrent l’ampleur du défi fondamental à relever.

Face à cette transition démographique, à ce grisonnement de la population, la Silver Economy ou Silver Economie, aussi appelée « économie du vieillissement », est une filière en plein essor qui a de beaux jours devant elle (lancement d’un Salon professionnel des services et technologies pour les seniors par exemple). D’après un rapport rédigé par Jean Pisani Ferry, Commissaire Général à la Stratégie et à la Prospective chez France Stratégie (institution autonome placée sous l’autorité du Premier Ministre), « le revenu disponible des plus de 60 ans représentait en 2010 environ 424 milliards d’euros. À toutes choses égales d’ailleurs, les simples projections par âge de la population française laissent attendre une hausse de 150% de la taille de ce marché via l’augmentation du nombre de seniors d’ici 2050 ».

Dans ce secteur à forte croissance, annonceurs, publicitaires et communicants se voient contraints de soutenir un profond paradoxe : d’une part, les personnes âgées,  réparties en 4 groupes par les professionnels du marketing (les 50-59 ans, les 60-75 ans, les 75-84 ans et les 84 ans et plus) constituent une cible marketing intéressante puisqu’ils n’ont ni emprunts, ni enfants à charge mais un pouvoir d’achat non négligeable et des attentes et besoins bien spécifiques ; d’autre part, ces segments d’âge, avec les connotations qui leur sont en général associées, ne séduisent guère car ils ont perdu l’apparence du rêve traditionnellement vendu par la publicité.

Dans ce contexte, les différents discours tenus par les publicitaires et les annonceurs sur le vieillissement, que celui-ci soit au centre de la force de persuasion ou en périphérie comme faire-valoir, apparaissent comme des récits sur des thématiques variées qui construisent attitudes, représentations et croyances de l’opinion publique. Ils sont donc des énoncés d’influence (Kapferer, 1979) qui, une fois soumis à l’analyse multimodale (Machin (2007), Fairclough (2003)) dessinent les contours symboliques (Dupont (2010)) et idéologiques du phénomène dans une société donnée tout en reproduisant les valeurs, les idées politiques et les pratiques socio-culturelles de cette même société (Simpson (1993), Mayr (2008)). Comment les messages représentant le vieillissement le transforment-ils en mythe au sens de Barthes (1964)) ? Comment révèlent-ils les enjeux de pouvoir (politiques, économiques, industriels, socio-culturels, etc.) qui lui sont associés ?

Les communications s’intéresseront donc aux pratiques discursives publicitaires sur le vieillissement et à destination ou non des seniors par le prisme des 3 problématiques principales ci-dessous (sans que cette liste soit exhaustive). Pourront être étudiées des campagnes de communication à visée marchande ou non marchande (comme des campagnes publiques de prévention ou de sensibilisation) :

Temporalités, sociétés et rhétorique

–    Étude diachronique de la représentation du vieillissement : différences et/ou continuités dans le temps ;

–    Étude comparative de la représentation du vieillissement dans des aires géographiques différentes : disparités et/ou similarités dans l’espace socio-économico-géographique et culturel ;

–    Étude comparative de la représentation du vieillissement dans les différents types de messages publicitaires : contrastes et/ou similarités selon les produits / services publicisés, le public visé, le medium utilisé.

Paradoxes et discordances

–    Discours publicitaires tenus sur la vieillesse et le vieillissement : reflets fidèles ou discordances, selon les émetteurs et les destinataires, le discours tenu, et les modalités de communication ; évolution des rôles sociaux lors du processus de vieillissement et les représentations dans le discours publicitaire ;

–    Paradoxes dans les représentations de la vieillesse et du vieillissement : vieillissement au carrefour du réalisme, de l’idéalisation et de la péjoration/dépréciation, refus de vieillir et vulnérabilité, détérioration vs conservation ;

–    Agisme vs jeunisme : discrimination, préjugés et perpétuation des croyances ; la vieillesse comme une menace ; tension entre maturité et jeunesse éternelle ; le “vieillir jeune“.

Idéologie et pouvoir

–    Vieillissement et enjeux de pouvoir : forces et faiblesses ; théorie et pratique ;

–    Enjeux idéologiques : façonnement de la représentation de la vieillesse et du vieillissement par le biais du discours publicitaire produit : la vieillesse conçue comme maladie, mythe de l’immortalité ou éternelle jeunesse, individualisme et dépendance ;

–    Les 50 ans et plus : stéréotypes, caricatures, conformités et diversités : discours institutionnel/gouvernemental et risque individuel et collectif, maîtrise du vieillissement, modèles identitaires et identité.

Les communications sont ouvertes à tous, chercheurs en linguistique, en sciences de l’information et de la communication, en sociologie, en psychologie sociale, etc. c’est-à-dire à tous les chercheurs qui travaillent sur les questions de l’influence sociale dans le champ marketing et se revendiquent d’une approche multimodale en analyse de discours.

Bibliographie indicative

AYALON Liat & GEWIRTZ-MEYDAN Ateret,2017, “Senior, mature or single: A qualitative analysis of homepage advertisements of dating sites for older adults”, Computers in Human Behavior, 75, 876-882.

BALAZS A. L., 1995, “The use and image of mature adults in health care advertising (1954-1989)”, Health marketing quarterly, 12(3), 13–26.

BARTHES Roland, 1964, « Rhétorique de l’image », Communications, 4 : Recherches sémiologiques : 40-51.

BERTHELOT-GUIET Karine, 2013, Paroles de Pub. La vie triviale de la publicité, Paris, Éditions Non standard.

BERTHELOT-GUIET Karine, 2015, Analyser les discours publicitaires, Paris, Armand Collin.

BONHOMME Marc (Ed.), 2013, « Les nouveaux discours publicitaires », SEMEN 36 | 2013 : https://journals.openedition.org/semen/9599

BRADLEY E. & LONGINO C. F., 2003, “How older people think about images of aging in advertising and the media”, Generations, the American society on aging, Vol. XXV, n° 3, 17-21.

CARRIGAN Marylyn & SZMIGIN Isabelle, 2002, Advertising and older consumers: image and ageism.

CHEVALIER Corinne & MOAL-ULVOAS Gaelle, 2018, “The use of mature models in advertisements and its contribution to the spirituality of older consumers”, Journal of Consumer Marketing, 10.1108/JCM-04-2017-2175.

COOK Guy, 2001, Discourse of advertising, New York, NY: Routledge.

DEBRAY Régis, 1991, Cours de médiologie générale, Paris, Gallimard.

DUPONT Luc, 2010, « Sur la représentation du vieillissement dans la publicité », in LAGACÉ Martine (dir.), L’âgisme : comprendre et changer le regard social sur le vieillissement, Québec, Presses de l’Université Laval, 41-58.

EVERAERT-DESMEDT Nicole, 2005, « Évolution du discours publicitaire » : http://nicole-everaert-semio.be/PDF/fr/evolution_disc_publicite.pdf  

FAIRCLOUGH Norman, 2003, Analysing Discourse. Textual Analysis for Social Research, London.

FEILLET Raymonde, BODIN Dominique & HÉAS Stéphane, 2010, « Corps âgé et médias : entre espoir de vieillir jeune et menace de la dépendance », Études de communication[En ligne], 35 | 2010, mis en ligne le 01 décembre 2012, URL : http://journals.openedition.org/edc/2283

FILL Chris, 2002, Marketing Communications: contexts, strategies and applications, Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall.

FORCEVILLE Charles, 2010, “The Routledge handbook of multimodal analysis (2009)”, Journal of Pragmatics, 42: 2604-2608.

FRIEDAN B., 1993, The Fountain of Age, London, Cape Books.

GANTZ Walter, GARTENBERG Howard M., RAINBOW Cindy K., 1980, “Approaching Invisibility: The Portrayal of the Elderly in Magazine Advertisements”, Journal of Communication, Volume 30, Issue 1, 56–60.

GRECO A. J., 1989, “Representation of the Elderly in Advertising: Crisis or Inconsequence”, Journal of Consumer Marketing 6(1), 37–44.

GUNTER Barry, 1998, Understanding the Older Consumer, The Grey Market, Routledge.

KAPFERER Jean-Noël, 1979 (2è ed.), Les chemins de la persuasion. Le mode dinfluence des médias et de la publicité sur les comportements, Paris : Dunod.

KATZ S., 1999, “Busy Bodies: Activity, Aging and the Management of Everyday Life”, Journal of Aging Studies 1(2), 135–152.

KRESS Gunther, 2010, Multimodality, London: Routledge.

KRESS Gunther & VAN LEEUWEN Theo, 1996, Reading images: The grammar of visual design, London: Routledge.

KRESS Gunther & VAN LEEUWEN Theo, 2001, Multimodal discourse: The modes and media of contemporary communication, London: Arnold.

LAGACÉ Martine, 2010, L’âgisme. Comprendre et changer le regard social sur le vieillissement, Presses universitaires de Laval.

LEGROS Patrick, 2009, « Le corps de la vieillesse dans la publicité et le marketing », Magma, Observatorio Processi Comunicativi (Catania – Italy), vol. 7, n°3, 30-44.

LIPOVETSKY Gilles, 2004, Les temps hypermodernes, Paris, Grasset.

MACHIN David, 2013, “Introduction: What is multimodal critical discourse studies?”, Critical Discourse Studies, Vol.10, No. 4: 347-355.

MAINGUENEAU Dominique, « Pertinence de la notion de formation discursive en analyse de discours », Langage et société, 2011/1, n° 135, 87-99.https://www.cairn.info/revue-langage-et-societe-2011-1-page-87.htm

MESSARIS Paul, 1997, Visual Persuasion: The Role of Images in Advertising, SAGE Publications.

MOSBERG IVERSEN Sara & WILIŃSKA Monika, 2019, “Ageing, old age and media: Critical appraisal of knowledge practices in academic research”, International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, 10.3384/ijal.1652-8670.18441, 1-29.

OGNJANOV Galjina, 2017, “Elderly consumers existent or not?: Portrayal of consumers 65+ in print ads in Serbia”, Marketing48, 4, 183-188.

PÉREZ SOBRINO Paula, 2017, Multimodal Metaphor and Metonymy in Advertising, John Benjamins.

PETERSON Robin T., 1992, “The depiction of senior citizens in magazine advertisements: A content analysis””, Journal of Business Ethics, volume 11, 701–706.

PLANTIN Christian, 1996, L’argumentation, ‘Mémo’, Paris : Seuil.

PRICKEN Mario, 2004, Creative advertising: ideas and techniques from the world’s best campaigns, London: Thames & Hudson.

RIOU Nicolas, 1999, Pub Fiction. Société postmoderne et nouvelles tendances publicitaires, Paris : Éditions d’Organisation.

ROSENTHAL Benjamin, CARDOSO Flavia & ABDALLA Carla, 2020, “(Mis)Representations of older consumers in advertising: stigma and inadequacy in ageing societies”, Journal of Marketing Management, 1-25.

SHAVITT S., LOWERY P. & HAEFNER J., 1998, “Public Attitudes Toward Advertising: More Favorable Than You Might Think”, Journal of Advertising Research 38(4), 7–22.

SUDBURY-RILEY Lynn, 2006, “The Invisible Majority? Older Models in UK Television Advertising”, International Journal of Advertising 25, 87-106.

SUDBURY-RILEY Lynn, 2016, “The baby boomer market maven in the United Kingdom: an experienced diffuser of marketplace information”, Journal of Marketing Management32, 7-8, 716-749.

URSIC Anthony C., URSIC Michael L. & URSIC Virginia L., “A Longitudinal Study of the Use of the Elderly in Magazine Advertising”, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 13, Issue 1, June 1986, 131-133.

WALKER M. M. & MACKLIN C. M., 1992, “The Use of Role-Modeling in Targeting Advertising to Grand- parents”, Journal of Advertising Research 32(4), 37–44.

WILLIAMS Angie, YLÄNNE Virpi, WADLEIGH Paul Mark & CHEN Chin-Hui, 2010, “Portrayals of older adults in UK magazine advertisements: Relevance of target audience”,Communications 35(1), 1-27.

WHITELAW N.A., 2000, “Myths and Realities of Aging 2000”, Gerontologist 40(14), 370.

WOLFE D. B., 1992, “The Key to Marketing to Older Consumers”, Journal of Business Strategy 13(6), 14–18.

Comité scientifique

  • Erik Bertin (Sciences Po – CeRes Université de Limoges)
  • Marc Bonhomme (Université de Berne, Suisse)
  • Lucile Bordet (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France – CEL)
  • Muriel Cassel-Piccot (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France – CEL)
  • Nathalie Deley (Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, France – ELICO)
  • Gustavo Gomez-Mejia (Université de Tours – PRIM)
  • Denis Jamet (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France & University of Arizona, USA – CEL)
  • Patrick Legros (Université de Tours)
  • Caroline Marti (Celsa Sorbonne Université – GRIPIC)
  • Philippe Millot (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France – CEL)
  • Adrian Staii (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France – ELICO)

Comité d’organisation

  • Thomas Bihay (Université Lyon 2 – ELICO & Université Clermont Auvergne – Comsocs)
  • Lucile Bordet (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France – CEL)
  • Muriel Cassel-Piccot (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France – CEL)
  • Nathalie Deley (Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, France – ELICO)
  • Denis Jamet (Université de Lyon, Jean Moulin Lyon 3, France & University of Arizona, USA – CEL)

Soumission des propositions

Les propositions de communication devront être envoyées à Lucile Bordet, Muriel Cassel-Piccot et Denis Jamet à l’adresse cel@univ-lyon3.fr avant le 31 août 2021.

Date de notification de la décision du comité scientifique : septembre 2021.

Les propositions devront comporter 5000 signes maximum, hors références bibliographiques, avec 5 mots-clés, un titre, la mention de la langue de présentation, ainsi qu’une courte présentation de l’auteur ; elles devront clairement énoncer le cadre théorique, la méthodologie adoptée, et le corpus choisi. Chaque proposition fera l’objet d’une double évaluation à l’aveugle.

Langue étudiée : anglais, français

Langues du colloque : anglais, français

Langue de la publication : anglais, français

Durée des communications : 30 minutes de communication, 15 minutes de discussion

Publication : les communications retenues par le comité éditorial à l’issue de la journée d’étude pourront donner lieu à une publication dans un numéro spécial de ELAD-SILDA, la revue du CEL.

AAC – Postmodalité & expressions modales, Caen, 02-03.06.2022

La postmodalité et les cycles de vie des expressions modales

Les 2 et 3            juin 2022, Université de Caen Normandie

Conférenciers invités

Martin Becker (Cologne)

Agnès Celle (Paris)

Heiko Narrog (Tohoku), en visioconférence

Organisation

Laboratoire CRISCO EA4255

Evgeniya Gorshkova-Lamy

Adeline Patard

Rea Peltola

Contact

postmodality@sciencesconf.org

Soumission des propositions

Les propositions de communications anonymisées n’excéderont pas 500 mots (sans les références). Elles devront être déposées sur la plateforme Sciencesconf (https://postmodality.sciencesconf.org) avant le 30 novembre 2021. Chaque résumé sera évalué par au moins deux relecteurs. Les notifications d’acceptation seront envoyées aux participants en février 2022. La durée de chaque communication sera de 20 minutes, suivie de 10 minutes de discussion. La langue d’usage pourra être l’anglais ou le français.

Appel à communication

L’évolution des expressions modales à travers les langues est habituellement décrite en termes de chaînes de grammaticalisation formées par différents stades de sémanticité se succédant dans un ordre déterminé. Des éléments lexicaux ou sémantiquement plus concrets se grammaticalisent en marqueurs modaux exprimant différentes nuances de possibilité ou de nécessité (si on opte pour une définition stricte de la modalité) pour finalement subir une « javellisation sémantique » (e. g. Lehmann 2015) conduisant à un sens moins spécifique et plus abstrait. Bybee, Perkins et Pagliuca (1994) ont identifié de tels chemins de développement dans un ensemble de langues non apparentées et pour différents types de modalité. D’après les auteurs, tous ces chemins retracent une évolution partant de sens source « orientés vers l’agent » passant par des modalités épistémiques et « orientées vers le locuteur » et aboutissant à des emplois de subordination.

Van der Auwera & Plungian (1998) élaborent ces chemins d’évolutions et les réunissent dans une seule et même carte correspondant à trois domaines. Un premier domaine prémodal regroupe les différentes sources lexicales des expressions qui entrent ensuite dans le domaine modal proprement dit à travers une auxiliarisation ou un autre processus de grammaticalisation. Vient enfin le domaine postmodal qui comprend un ensemble hétérogène d’items désémanticisés qui n’expriment plus la modalité. Un exemple très connu est le cas des futurs romans issus de la périphrase modale habere + INF du latin (cantare habeo « je peux/dois chanter ») : cette dernière a cessé d’exprimer la possibilité et la nécessité en se grammaticalisant en temps verbal (chanterai). En anglais, l’auxiliaire modal should est utilisé dans des contextes non nécessifs pour marquer que l’événement dévie des attentes du locuteur : – Can I get you some coffee? – Strange that you should ask « Veux-tu un petit café ? » « C’est étrange que tu [should] me le demandes » (voir Celle 2018 : 39). A la frontière entre domaines modal et postmodal, les chemins de grammaticalisation semblent se croiser dans la mesure où les marqueurs de possibilité et de nécessité peuvent développer les mêmes sens postmodaux. Ce fait est un des principaux arguments avancés par van der Auwera & Plungian (1998) pour concaténer les différents chemins d’évolution en une seule carte. Les évolutions décrites peuvent procéder de différents mécanismes sémantiques : spécialisation, généralisation et extension du sens (métaphore et métonymie).

Ces modèles ont ensuite inspiré de nombreuses études menées à la fois dans une perspective typologique et sur des langues individuelles. La carte sémantique de la modalité a été affinée, étoffée et discutée (voir p. ex. van der Auwera, Kehayov & Vittrant 2009 ; van der Auwera 2013 ; Traugott 2016 ; Georgakopoulos & Polis 2018). On a ainsi attiré l’attention sur l’évolution de catégories modales non-verbales, la restriction aréale de certains chemins de grammaticalisation et la variation inter-langue concernant la présence et l’évolution de certaines sous-catégories modales (p. ex. Traugott 2011 ; Narrog 2012 ; Becker 2014). Des approches constructionnelles ont aussi récemment entrepris d’explorer des évolutions sémantiques liées à la fois à des processus de grammaticalisation et de lexicalisation au sein de réseaux de constructions, au-delà des unités linguistiques individuelles (e. g. Hilpert 2016 ; Cappelle & Depraetere 2016 ; Hilpert, Cappelle & Depraetere, à paraître ; voir aussi Schulze & Hohaus 2020).

Dans cette conférence, nous souhaitons approfondir la réflexion sur les stades avancés dans l’évolution des expressions modales, c’est-à-dire : le passage du domaine modal au domaine postmodal, la structure interne du champ postmodal et les possibles cycles de remodalisation. Les contributions pourront s’inscrire dans n’importe quelle approche théorique et méthodologique de la linguistique sans restriction sur la (ou les) langue(s) étudiée(s). Le colloque pourra aborder, mais sans s’y limiter, les thèmes et questions suivantes :

●      Diverses notions sémantiques/fonctionnelles ont été convoquées pour décrire la sphère postmodale, comme la concession, la condition, la complémentation, l’optativité, le temps futur, la citation (« quotative »), la consécution. Dans quelle mesure ce large éventail de concepts s’applique-t-il aux langues individuelles ? À travers les langues ? Qu’est-ce que ces valeurs et fonctions partagent si l’on examine les chemins individuels de désémantisation déjà connus ? En quoi la démodalisation interagit-elle avec des éléments comme la négation, l’aspect ou le temps (voir Caudal 2018) ?

●      Quels mécanismes sémantiques et quels paramètres internes et externes du changement peut-on retrouver dans les langues du monde ? Le rôle du contexte dans l’émergence des effets postmodaux semblent également primordial, comme le remarque Le Querler (2001) qui parle des emplois de pouvoir postmodal impliquant la « prise en compte de l’énoncé dans son ensemble, voire même d’une partie plus large du discours, ou encore de la communication ». Dans quelle mesure ces structures phrastiques/discursives sont-elles conventionnalisées / forment-t-elle des « constructions » plus larges (Goldberg 2010) et donc des signes linguistiques à part entière ?

●      Les limites entre les catégories qui constituent la carte sémantique de la modalité ne sont pas nettes mais plutôt graduelles voire floues (voir van der Auwera & Plungian 1998 : 88).  Quels sont les changements progressifs qui opèrent dans l’intervalle entre modalité et postmodalité ? A travers quels changements sémantiques l’origine de la modalité détermine-t-elle les valeurs post-modales qui émergent ? S’agit-il nécessairement d’un allègement ou d’un affaiblissement du sens modal, ou bien d’une « redistribution » du sens et d’un renforcement pragmatique comme dans les premières phases de grammaticalisation (Heine, Claudi & Hünnemeyer 1991, Hopper et Traugott 1993) ? Ou devrait-on parler de différents niveaux de modalité et d’un sens modal plus « élusif » comme suggéré par Celle (2018) pour certains usages de would et should en anglais ?

●      L’altération de l’intégrité sémantique opère de façon non-uniforme : certains éléments sémantiques restent, d’autres se perdent en chemin (p. ex. Lehmann 2015 : 136-137). Comment décrire le processus de désémantisation en termes de sémantique cognitive ? Quelles structures conceptuelles sont préservées dans la transition vers la postmodalité ? Comment rendre compte de l’émergence de sens postmodaux, p. ex. en termes de « profilage » (voir Langacker 2015: 211–212) ou de « dynamique des forces » (Talmy 1988 ; Kehayov 2017 : 39) ?

●      La grammaticalisation recoupe le phénomène de subjectification/intersubjectification (Traugott 2010). Par exemple, les auxiliaires du suédois et måtte montrent un haut degré d’intersubjectification en tant que marqueurs postmodaux (Beijering 2017). En français, Le Querler (2001) fait référence aux fonctions « discursives » de pouvoir démodalisé. Même le mode subjonctif, catégorie postmodale par excellence, peut être considéré comme un moyen d’assurer la cohésion du discours. L’espace temporel et modal dans lequel l’événement exprimé par les phrases subjonctives a lieu se construit dans un ailleurs. Avec une construction complétive, la principale fournit l’ancrage nécessaire à la subordonnée subjonctive, alors que la principale subjonctive s’appuie sur une prise en charge énonciative (voir Gosselin 2005 : 95). Le potentiel sémantique laissé par les composants de sens perdus sert-il d’une certaine façon l’interaction, le discours et le texte ? A travers quels mécanismes cela se produit-il ?

●      Bien que souvent associées au domaine verbal, les catégories modales ne s’y limitent toutefois pas (voir Gosselin 2010 pour différents exemples). De quelles manières la postmodalité touche-t-elle d’autres catégories syntaxiques (noms, adjectifs, adverbes) ? Les chemins de développement sont-ils les mêmes que pour le domaine verbal ?

●      La nature cyclique du changement sémantique apparaît pour diverses catégories syntaxiques et sémantiques (voir van Gelderen 2009). Dans la littérature sur la grammaticalisation d’éléments modaux, il existe des exemples d’expressions connaissant des « cycles complets » dans leur évolution. Par exemple, le temps futur est, d’une part, le résultat d’une démodalisation et, d’autre part, la source remodalisée d’un nouveau sens modal (van der Auwera & Plungian 1998 : 97). Comment appréhender les relations entre « générations » d’expressions modales ? Dans quelle mesure l’analogie entre l’évolution des organismes biologiques et le changement linguistique peut-elle être hasardeuse (Dahl 2001) ?

Bibliographie

Becker, Martin. 2014. Welten in Sprache. Zur Entwicklung der Kategorie «Modus» in romanischen Sprachen (Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für romanische Philologie 386), Berlin, Boston: Walter de Gruyter.

Beijering, Karin. 2017. Grammaticalization and (inter)subjectification: The case of the Swedish modals and måtte. In Van Olmen, Daniel & Cuyckens, Hubert & Ghesquière, Lobke (eds.), Aspects of Grammaticalization: (Inter)Subjectification and Directionality, 47–80. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Bybee, Joan & Perkins, Revere & Pagliuca, William. 1994. The Evolution of Grammar: Tense, Aspect, and Modality in the Languages of the World. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse. 2016. Short-circuited interpretations of modal verb constructions: Some evidence from The Simpsons. In Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse (eds.), Modal Meaning in Construction Grammar, 7–39. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Caudal, Patrick. 2018. De la théorie du sens, à celle des appariements formes/sens: synthèse de quinze ans de recherche sur le TAM(E). Mémoire d’habilitation à diriger les recherches. Université Paris-Diderot. https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-01973346, accessed March 24, 2021.

Celle, Agnès. 2018. Epistemic evaluation in factual contexts in English. In Guentchéva, Zlatka (ed.), Epistemic Modality and Evidentiality in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective, 22–51. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Dahl, Östen. 2001. Grammaticalization and the life cycles of constructions. RASK – Internationalt tidsskrift for sprog og kommunikation 14, 91–134.

Georgakopoulos, Thanasis & Polis, Stéphane. 2018. The semantic map model: State of the art and future avenues for linguistic research. Language and Linguistics Compass 12.

Goldberg, Adele. 2006. Constructions at Work: The Nature of Generalization in Language, Oxford University Press: Oxford.

Gosselin, Laurent. 2005. Temporalité et modalité. Bruxelles: De Boeck Duculot.

Gosselin, Laurent.  2010. Les modalités en français. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Heine, Вernd & Claudi Ulrike & Hünnemeyer, Friederike. 1991. Grammaticalization. A Conceptual Framework. Chicago:  The University of Chicago Press.

Hilpert, Martin. 2016. Change in modal meanings: Another look at the shifting collocates of may. In Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse (eds.), Modal Meaning in Construction Grammar, 66–85. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Hilpert, Martin & Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse (eds.). To appear. Modality and Diachronic Construction Grammar. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Hopper, Paul & Traugott, Elizabeth. 1993. Grammaticalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kehayov, Petar. 2017. The Fate of Mood and Modality in Language Death. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Langacker, Ronald W. 2015. Descriptive and discursive organization in cognitive grammar. In Daems, Jocelyne & Zenner, Eline & Heylen, Kris & Speelman, Dirk & Cuyckens, Hubert (eds.), Change of Paradigms – New Paradoxes, 205–218. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Lehmann, Christian. 2015. Thoughts on grammaticalization. 3rd ed. Berlin: Language Science Press.

Le Querler, Nicole. 2001. La place du verbe modal pouvoir dans une typologie des modalités. In Dendale, Patrick & van der Auwera, Johan (eds.), Les verbes modaux, 17–32. Cahiers Chronos 8. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Narrog, Heiko. 2012. Modality, subjectivity, and semantic change. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Schulze, Rainer & Hohaus, Pascal. 2020. Modalising expressions and modality: An overview of trends and challenges. In Hohaus, Pascal & Schulze, Rainer (eds.), Re-Assessing Modalising Expressions: Categories, co-text, and context, 1–15. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Talmy, Leonard. 1988. Force Dynamics in language and cognition. Cognitive Science 12, 49–100.

Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 2010. (Inter)subjectivity and (inter)subjectification: A reassessment. In Davidse, Kristin & Vandelanotte, Lieven & Cuyckens, Hubert (eds.), Subjectification, Intersubjectification and Grammaticalization, 29–74. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 2011. Modality from a historical perspective. Language and Linguistics Compass 5, 381–396.

Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 2016. Do semantic modal maps have a role in a constructionalization approach to modals? Constructions and Frames 8, 97–124.

van der Auwera, Johan. 2013. Semantic maps, for synchronic and diachronic typology. In Giacalone Ramat, Anna & Mauri, Caterina & Molinelli, Piera (eds.), Synchrony and Diachrony: A Dynamic Interface, 153–176. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

van der Auwera, Johan & Plungian, Vladimir A. 1998. Modality’s semantic map. Linguistic Typology 2, 79–124.

van der Auwera, Johan & Kehayov, Petar & Vittrant, Alice. 2009. Acquisitive modals. In Hogeweg, Lotte & de Hoop, Helen & Malchukov, Andrej (eds.), Cross-linguistics Semantics of Tense, Aspect, and Modality, 271–302. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

van Gelderen, Elly. 2009. Cyclical change, an introduction. In van Gelderen, Elly (ed.), Cyclical Change, 1–12. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Ziegeler, Debra. 2003. Redefining unidirectionality: Insights from demodalisation?, Folia Linguistica Historica 24: 1–2, 225–266.

Ziegeler, Debra. 2004. Redefining unidirectionality: Is there life after modality? In Fischer, Olga & Norde, Muriel & Perridon, Harry (eds.), Up and Down the Cline, 115–135. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

 Postmodality and the Life Cycles of Modal Expressions

2-3 June 2022, University of Caen Normandy

Keynote speakers

Martin Becker (Köln)

Agnès Celle (Paris)

Heiko Narrog (Tohoku), video conference

Organization

CRISCO EA4255 Research center

Evgeniya Gorshkova-Lamy

Adeline Patard

Rea Peltola

Contact

postmodality@sciencesconf.org

Abstract submission

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 500 words, excluding references, are to be submitted by November 30, 2021, via Sciencesconf platform: https://postmodality.sciencesconf.org. Each abstract will be reviewed by (at least) two members of the Scientific committee. Notifications of acceptance will be sent in February 2022. The talks will be 20 minutes long, followed by 10 minutes for discussion. The working languages are English and French.

Call for papers

The cross-linguistic evolution of modal expressions is described as chain-like grammaticalization structures where items of different degrees of semanticity follow one another in a predetermined order. Lexical or otherwise semantically more concrete elements develop into different types of expressions of possibility and necessity until they eventually bleach into semantically less and less specific, abstract markers (e. g. Lehmann 2015). Bybee, Perkins & Pagliuca (1994) identified paths of development across a set of unrelated languages for different types of modalities. According to the authors, all these tracks present an evolution from agent-oriented source meanings through speaker-oriented and epistemic modalities to subordinate uses.

In van der Auwera & Plungian (1998), these paths were put together and elaborated into maps consisting of three domains. Premodal domain brings together lexical source expressions that enter the modal domain, sometimes through auxiliarization or other changes in grammatical shape. At the other end, postmodal sphere involves a rather heterogeneous set of desemanticized elements that no longer carry modal meaning. A famous example are the Romance future tenses stemming from the latin modal periphrasis habere + INF (cantare habeo ‘I can/must sing’) which ceased to convey possibility and necessity when grammaticalizing into a verbal tense (chanterai ‘I will sing’). Another case in point is the English modal auxiliary should when used for marking that the state of affairs deviates from the speaker’s expectations: – Can I get you some coffee? – Strange that you should ask (see Celle 2018: 39). At the interface between modal and postmodal domains, the grammaticalization paths cross, as both possibility and necessity tracks may lead to certain postmodal meanings. This was one of van der Auwera & Plungian’s (1998) main arguments for unifying the different paths into a map. The evolutions described by the map result from semantic processes of different types: specialization, generalization and extension (metaphor and metonymy).

These models have ever since inspired further studies, both in typological perspective and in individual languages. Modality’s semantic map has been finetuned, elaborated and discussed (e. g. van der Auwera, Kehayov & Vittrant 2009; van der Auwera 2013; Traugott 2016; Georgakopoulos & Polis 2018). Attention has been drawn to the evolution of non-verbal modal categories, the areal restriction in certain grammaticalization paths and the crosslinguistic variation as to the presence and evolution of particular subcategories of modality (e. g. Traugott 2011; Narrog 2012; Becker 2014). Constructional approaches have recently undertaken to research the evolution of modal meanings in patterns where both grammaticalization and lexicalization processes come into play and as part of developments within networks of constructions, beyond individual units (e. g. Hilpert 2016; Cappelle & Depraetere 2016; Hilpert, Cappelle & Depraetere, to appear; see also Schulze & Hohaus 2020).

With this conference, we aim to shed light on the late stages in the evolution of modal items, namely the transition from modal to postmodal domain, the internal structure of the postmodal category and the possible remodalization cycles. We call for contributions from different theoretical and methodological approaches and concerning any language. The conference focusses on, but is not restricted to, the following topics and questions:

●    Various semantic-functional notions have been identified at the border separating modal and postmodal spheres, such as concession, condition, complementation, optative, future-time, quotative and consecution. How to operate with this rich array of concepts within a language and cross-linguistically? What do these meanings and functions have in common, when looking at the individual desemantization paths taken by the different postmodal items that we already know of? How does demodalization interact with negation, aspect (see Caudal 2018) or tense?  Are there new items we could add to the list of postmodal elements from studies on different languages?

●    Which semantic mechanisms and internal and external parameters of change can be found across languages? Which are the contexts triggering the far-reaching grammaticalization process? Le Querler (2001) argues that the demodalized meaning of the French pouvoir stems from the utterance as a whole. To what extent are phrasal or discursive structures carrying postmodal meaning conventionalized as constructions (Goldberg 2010) and, thus, form linguistic units of their own? 

●    The limits separating the categories that form Modality’s semantic map are not sharp but rather gradual, or even fuzzy (see van der Auwera & Plungian 1998: 88). How are clines of change manifest in the modal-postmodal interval? Through which semantic processes do the modal origins determine the emerging postmodal meanings? Is it necessarily about the modal meaning becoming weaker or lower, or rather a shift or a redistribution of meaning and pragmatic reinforcement, as in the early stages of grammaticalization (Heine, Claudi & Hünnemeyer 1991, Hopper & Traugott 1993)? Or should we talk about different layers of modality and more elusive modal meaning, as suggested by Celle (2018) when investigating the English would and should in factual but affective utterances?

●    The decrease in semantic integrity proceeds unevenly: certain semantic components pertain, others are lost underway (e. g. Lehmann 2015: 136–137). How can we describe the desemantization process in cognitive semantic terms? Which conceptual structures remain in the transition from modal to postmodal? How can we account for the emergence of postmodal meanings, e. g. in terms of profiling (e. g. Langacker 2015: 211–212) or Force Dynamics (Talmy 1988; Kehayov 2017: 39)?

●    Grammaticalization intersects with (inter)subjectification of meaning (Traugott 2010). For example, the Swedish auxiliaries ‘may, should’ and måtte ‘may, must’ display high degrees of intersubjectification as postmodal markers (Beijering 2017). In French, Le Querler (2001) has referred to discursive functions of demodalized pouvoir ‘can’. Even the subjunctive mood, postmodal category par excellence, can be considered as means for marking cohesion in discourse. The temporal and modal space within which the event expressed by the subjunctive clause takes place is construed elsewhere. In a complement construction, the matrix provides the necessary anchoring for the subordinate subjunctive clause, while subjunctive main clauses rely on the enunciative grounding (see Gosselin 2005: 95). Is the semantic potential (or openness) left by the lost meaning components somehow put at the service of interaction, discourse and text? Through what mechanisms does this happen?

●    Not all modal categories are verbal (see Gosselin 2010 for examples). In what ways does postmodality involve other syntactic categories (nouns, adjectives, adverbs)? Are the paths of evolution the same as those identified in the verbal domain?

●    The cyclical nature of linguistic change is observed in various syntactic and semantic categories (see van Gelderen 2009). In the literature concerning the grammaticalization of modal elements, there are some examples of items displaying “full cycles” in their evolution. For example, the future tense can be the result of demodalization, on the one hand, and the remodalized source for new modal meanings, on the other (van der Auwera & Plungian 1998: 97). How to describe the relationships between “generations” of modal elements? What risks are associated with conveying analogies between evolution in biological organisms and linguistic change (Dahl 2001)?

References

Becker, Martin. 2014. Welten in Sprache. Zur Entwicklung der Kategorie «Modus» in romanischen Sprachen (Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für romanische Philologie 386), Berlin, Boston: Walter de Gruyter.

Beijering, Karin. 2017. Grammaticalization and (inter)subjectification: The case of the Swedish modals and måtte. In Van Olmen, Daniel & Cuyckens, Hubert & Ghesquière, Lobke (eds.), Aspects of Grammaticalization: (Inter)Subjectification and Directionality, 47–80. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Bybee, Joan & Perkins, Revere & Pagliuca, William. 1994. The Evolution of Grammar: Tense, Aspect, and Modality in the Languages of the World. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse. 2016. Short-circuited interpretations of modal verb constructions: Some evidence from The Simpsons. In Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse (eds.), Modal Meaning in Construction Grammar, 7–39. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Caudal, Patrick. 2018. De la théorie du sens, à celle des appariements formes/sens: synthèse de quinze ans de recherche sur le TAM(E). Mémoire d’habilitation à diriger les recherches. Université Paris-Diderot. https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-01973346, accessed March 24, 2021.

Celle, Agnès. 2018. Epistemic evaluation in factual contexts in English. In Guentchéva, Zlatka (ed.), Epistemic Modality and Evidentiality in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective, 22–51. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Dahl, Östen. 2001. Grammaticalization and the life cycles of constructions. RASK – Internationalt tidsskrift for sprog og kommunikation 14, 91–134.

Georgakopoulos, Thanasis & Polis, Stéphane. 2018. The semantic map model: State of the art and future avenues for linguistic research. Language and Linguistics Compass 12.

Goldberg, Adele. 2006. Constructions at Work: The Nature of Generalization in Language, Oxford University Press: Oxford.

Gosselin, Laurent. 2005. Temporalité et modalité. Bruxelles: De Boeck Duculot.

Gosselin, Laurent.  2010. Les modalités en français. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Heine, Вernd & Claudi Ulrike & Hünnemeyer, Friederike. 1991. Grammaticalization. A Conceptual Framework. Chicago:  The University of Chicago Press.

Hilpert, Martin. 2016. Change in modal meanings: Another look at the shifting collocates of may. In Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse (eds.), Modal Meaning in Construction Grammar, 66–85. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Hilpert, Martin & Cappelle, Bert & Depraetere, Ilse (eds.). To appear. Modality and Diachronic Construction Grammar. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Hopper, Paul & Traugott, Elizabeth. 1993. Grammaticalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kehayov, Petar. 2017. The Fate of Mood and Modality in Language Death. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Langacker, Ronald W. 2015. Descriptive and discursive organization in cognitive grammar. In Daems, Jocelyne & Zenner, Eline & Heylen, Kris & Speelman, Dirk & Cuyckens, Hubert (eds.), Change of Paradigms – New Paradoxes, 205–218. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

Lehmann, Christian. 2015. Thoughts on grammaticalization. 3rd ed. Berlin: Language Science Press.

Le Querler, Nicole. 2001. La place du verbe modal pouvoir dans une typologie des modalités. In Dendale, Patrick & van der Auwera, Johan (eds.), Les verbes modaux, 17–32. Cahiers Chronos 8. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Narrog, Heiko. 2012. Modality, subjectivity, and semantic change. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Schulze, Rainer & Hohaus, Pascal. 2020. Modalising expressions and modality: An overview of trends and challenges. In Hohaus, Pascal & Schulze, Rainer (eds.), Re-Assessing Modalising Expressions: Categories, co-text, and context, 1–15. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Talmy, Leonard. 1988. Force Dynamics in language and cognition. Cognitive Science 12, 49–100.

Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 2010. (Inter)subjectivity and (inter)subjectification: A reassessment. In Davidse, Kristin & Vandelanotte, Lieven & Cuyckens, Hubert (eds.), Subjectification, Intersubjectification and Grammaticalization, 29–74. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 2011. Modality from a historical perspective. Language and Linguistics Compass 5, 381–396.

Traugott, Elizabeth Closs. 2016. Do semantic modal maps have a role in a constructionalization approach to modals? Constructions and Frames 8, 97–124.

van der Auwera, Johan. 2013. Semantic maps, for synchronic and diachronic typology. In Giacalone Ramat, Anna & Mauri, Caterina & Molinelli, Piera (eds.), Synchrony and Diachrony: A Dynamic Interface, 153–176. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

van der Auwera, Johan & Plungian, Vladimir A. 1998. Modality’s semantic map. Linguistic Typology 2, 79–124.

van der Auwera, Johan & Kehayov, Petar & Vittrant, Alice. 2009. Acquisitive modals. In Hogeweg, Lotte & de Hoop, Helen & Malchukov, Andrej (eds.), Cross-linguistics Semantics of Tense, Aspect, and Modality, 271–302. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

van Gelderen, Elly. 2009. Cyclical change, an introduction. In van Gelderen, Elly (ed.), Cyclical Change, 1–12. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Colloque Aspect 2021 – podcasts de communications

Les vidéos YouTubes de certain.e.s des participant.e.s au colloque sur l’Aspect des 8 au 10 avril 2021, sont maintenant en ligne, et ce pour environ un mois. Ne manquez pas de faire profiter vos agrégatifs/ves de cette oportunité de voir ou revoir ces communications.

Allez régulièrement sur ce lien, d’autres vont être ajoutées :

Eric Corre

AAC – JE anglais de spécialité et linguistique, Sorbonne, 16.12.21

Appel à communications

Journée d’étude : Anglais de spécialité et linguistique

Co-organisée par :

Le Centre de Linguistique en Sorbonne (CeLiSo, UR 7332, Lettres Sorbonne
Université)

L’UR CEL (Centre d’Études Linguistiques – Corpus, Discours et Sociétés,
Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3)

Le Département des Langues de l’École Normale Supérieure Paris-Saclay

Date : Jeudi 16 décembre 2021

Lieu : Maison de la Recherche – Sorbonne Université,28 rue Serpente,
75006 PARIS.

En fonction de l’évolution de la situation sanitaire, la journée d’étude
pourra se tenir en format hybride.

L’anglais de spécialité s’intéresse à de nombreux faits de langue
caractéristiques de certaines variétés spécialisées de la langue
anglaise. À ce titre, la linguistique et la grammaire ont toujours été
au cœur de ses préoccupations scientifiques. Dans un article fondateur,
intitulé Some measurable characteristics of modern scientific prose,
Charles L. Barber (1962) s’attachait ainsi à recenser des schémas
grammaticaux dans un corpus relativement restreint de manuels et
d’articles scientifiques, sous l’angle de la grammaire descriptive.

Depuis, divers courants linguistiques, qu’il s’agisse la théorie des
opérations énonciatives, de la linguistique textuelle, de la
linguistique systémique fonctionnelle ou, plus récemment, de la
linguistique de corpus, de la sociolinguistique et de la linguistique
appliquée, ont inspiré de très nombreux travaux de recherche en anglais
de spécialité. En revanche, certains paradigmes linguistiques comme
l’approche générative chomskyenne ont, du moins en apparence, été très
peu sollicités dans les travaux d’anglais de spécialité.

Les objets de recherche relevant de ces approches linguistiques sont
multiples : liens entre marqueurs grammaticaux et degré de
spécialisation (Pic & Furmaniak 2014), corrélations entre syntaxe et
fonction rhétorique d’un texte spécialisé (Carter-Thomas &
Rowley-Jolivet 2014), caractérisation des marqueurs de complexité
grammaticale en rédaction scientifique (Biber et al. 2020),
questionnement épistémologique sur les relations entre approches
linguistiques et anglais de spécialité (Gledhill & Kübler 2016), pour ne
citer que quelques exemples.

Les interventions pourront porter, sans exclusive, sur les questions
suivantes :

Questions épistémologiques : quelle est la nature exacte des liens entre
linguistique et anglais de spécialité ? En anglais de spécialité, la
linguistique est-elle un outil d’analyse, un cadre théorique ou un
instrument heuristique ? Existe-t-il des approches linguistiques
spécifiques ou particulièrement recommandées pour traiter de certaines
variétés spécialisées de l’anglais ?

Anglais de spécialité et paradigmes théoriques en linguistique : si la
linguistique systémique fonctionnelle nourrit beaucoup de travaux
anglo-saxons (des travaux de recherche inédits relevant de cette
approche auraient naturellement toute leur place dans cette journée
d’étude), pourrait-on mobiliser avec fruit d’autres paradigmes
linguistiques en anglais de spécialité ?

Anglais de spécialité et branches de la linguistique : la lexicologie ou
les études syntaxiques ont déjà inspiré beaucoup de travaux d’anglais de
spécialité (de nouveaux travaux relevant de ces approches seraient tout
à fait bienvenus dans cette journée d’étude) ; cependant certaines
branches de la linguistique semblent encore peu mobilisées (phonétique,
phonologie, sémantique, pragmatique, sociolinguistique, linguistique
formelle, linguistique appliquée, etc.). L’anglais de spécialité doit-il
s’aventurer dans ces champs de la linguistique encore peu explorés ?

Grammaire : Peut-on ou doit-on parler de « grammaire spécialisée » ?
Dans quelle mesure la grammaire est-elle sensible au contexte de
production ? Peut-on défendre une grammaire prescriptive dans les
contextes d’enseignement LANSAD ?

Lexique : Comment aborder les domaines spécialisés anglophones d’un
point de vue lexicologique ?

Métaphores : Quelle pourrait être la contribution de la linguistique
cognitive à l’anglais de spécialité ?

Anglais de spécialité et linguistique de corpus : comment ces deux
disciplines peuvent-elles dialoguer pour élucider des questions de
phraséologie ou de prosodie sémantique ?

Références

Barber, C.- L. 1962. Some measurable characteristics of modern
scientific prose. In F. Behre & U. Ohlander (eds), Contributions to
English Syntax and Phonology. Gothenburg Studies in Linguistics 14.
Stockholm: Almquist and Wiksell, 21-43.

Biber, Douglas, B. Gray, S. Staples, & J. Egbert. 2020. Investigating
grammatical complexity in L2 English writing research: Linguistic
description versus predictive measurement. Journal of English for
Academic Purposes 46, <https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2020.100869>.

Carter-Thomas S. & E. Rowley-Jolivet. 2014. A syntactic perspective on
rhetorical purpose: The example of if-conditionals in medical
editorials. Ibérica 28, 59-82.

Gledhill C., N. Kübler. 2016. What can linguistic approaches bring to
English for Specific Purposes? ASp. 69, 65-95,

Pic, E., & G. Furmaniak. 2014. Impact du lectorat visé sur la grammaire.
ASp 65, 69-86.

Modalités de soumission :

La date limite d’envoi des propositions comprenant un titre et un résumé
(300-500 mots) est fixée au 25 AOUT 2021. Elles seront à adresser
conjointement à Fanny Domenec fanny.domenec@u-paris2.fr, Philippe Millot
philippe.millot@univ-lyon3.fr et Anthony Saber anthony.saber@ens-cachan.fr

Les langues utilisées seront le français ou l’anglais.

Call for papers

Seminar: English for specific purposes and linguistics

Co-organised by:

– Centre de Linguistique en Sorbonne (CeLiSo, UR 7332, Lettres Sorbonne
Université)

– L’UR CEL (Centre d’Études Linguistiques – Corpus, Discours et
Sociétés, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3)

– Département des Langues de l’École Normale Supérieure Paris-Saclay

Date: 16 December 2021

Location: Maison de la Recherche – Sorbonne Université, 28 rue Serpente,
75006 PARIS.

Depending on the sanitary conditions, the conference may be held in
hybrid format.

English for specific purposes (ESP) scholars have been exploring a wide
range of linguistic features associated with the specialised varieties
of English. It is therefore reasonable to say that grammar and
linguistics have always been a key area of interest in the domain. For
example, in a seminal article entitled “Some measurable characteristics
of modern scientific prose”, Charles L. Barber (1962) proposed a
descriptive grammar founded on a relatively small corpus of technical
and research articles.

Since then, diverse linguistic currents in France and abroad have
inspired many ESP scholars. In France, some scholars have used Antoine
Culioli’s théorie des opérations énonciatives or have worked within the
framework of “textual linguistics” (linguistique textuelle). Similarly,
and more internationally, scholars have used systemic functional
linguistics (SFL), sociolinguistics, applied linguistics or corpus
linguistics to analyse the specialised varieties of the English
language. It is interesting to note, however, that some linguistic
paradigms such as Chomsky’s generative grammar have received little
attention in ESP studies, at least apparently.

These linguistic approaches have uncovered many kinds of phenomena such
as how grammatical features tend to relate to specialisation degrees
(Pic & Furmaniak 2014), how syntax and rhetorical functions will
correlate with specialised texts (Carter-Thomas & Rowley-Jolivet 2014),
how scientific writing is marked by grammatical complexity (Biber et al.
2020), or how linguistic approaches may lead to epistemological
considerations about ESP (Gledhill & Kübler 2016).

The contributions may include – among other approaches:

Epistemological considerations: how do linguistics and ESP exactly
relate? Is linguistics a mere analytical tool, a theoretical framework
or a heuristic instrument? Are some linguistic approaches more
particularly recommended for dealing with specialised varieties of English?

ESP and theoretical paradigms in ESP: Systemic Functional Linguistics
has been used extensively in many studies and they are naturally
welcome. However, scholars from various theoretical backgrounds are also
invited to provide their own insights into ESP.

ESP and the branches of linguistics: Lexicology and syntax studies have
already yielded many results in ESP and they are naturally welcome.
However, scholars from the other branches of linguistics – e.g.,
phonetics, phonology, semantics, sociolinguistics, formal linguistics,
applied linguistics) are also encouraged to venture into those aspects
of ESP which have remained rather unexplored so far.

Grammar: Can we or should we use the term “specialised grammar”? To what
extent is grammar sensitive to the contexts of use? May any prescriptive
grammar be considered for ESP students?

Lexis: How can specialised domains be studied from a lexicological
viewpoint?

Metaphors: How may cognitive linguistics contribute to ESP?

ESP and corpus linguistics: How can the two disciplines be jointly used
to address issues in phraseology and semantic prosody?

References

Barber, C.- L. 1962. Some measurable characteristics of modern
scientific prose. In F. Behre & U. Ohlander (eds), Contributions to
English Syntax and Phonology. Gothenburg Studies in Linguistics 14.
Stockholm: Almquist and Wiksell, 21-43.

Biber, Douglas, B. Gray, S. Staples, & J. Egbert. 2020. Investigating
grammatical complexity in L2 English writing research: Linguistic
description versus predictive measurement. Journal of English for
Academic Purposes 46, <https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2020.100869>.

Carter-Thomas S. & E. Rowley-Jolivet. 2014. A syntactic perspective on
rhetorical purpose: The example of if-conditionals in medical
editorials. Ibérica 28, 59-82.

Gledhill C., N. Kübler. 2016. What can linguistic approaches bring to
English for Specific Purposes? ASp. 69, 65-95,

Pic, E., & G. Furmaniak. 2014. Impact du lectorat visé sur la grammaire.
ASp 65, 69-86.

Submission guidelines:

Proposals for conference papers (title + abstract of 300-500 words) are
to be sent to Fanny Domenec fanny.domenec@u-paris2.fr, Philippe Millot
philippe.millot@univ-lyon3.fr and Anthony Saber
anthony.saber@ens-cachan.fr by AUGUST 25 2021.

Languages for the conference are English and French.

CFP – 16th ESSE Conference, Mainz 2022

Department of English and Linguistics, Faculty of Philosophy and Philology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz,
and
Deutscher Anglistenverband (German Society for the Study of English)
look forward to welcoming you to the 16th ESSE Conference in Mainz, Germany,
Monday 29 August – Friday 2 September 2022


DEADLINES
• Submission of proposals for Parallel Lectures (nomination by national associations): 31 May 2021
• Submission of proposals for Seminars and Round Tables (proposals from prospective convenors): 31 May 2021
• Submission of individual papers for Seminars and the Doctoral Symposium, as well as proposals for Round Tables and Posters: 31 January 2022
• Registration will begin on 1 March 2022


https://esse2022.uni-mainz.de/


Vincent Renner
For the Academic Programme Committee

AAC – JE discours publicitaires / vieillissement – Lyon 3, 9-10.12.2021

Le Centre d’Études Linguistiques – Corpus, Discours et Sociétés (CEL – EA 1663) de la Faculté des Langues organise avec ELICO une troisième journée d’étude sur « La « force grise » dans les discours publicitaires marchands et non marchands : la société face à ses représentations du vieillissement », qui se tiendra les jeudi 9 et vendredi 10 décembre 2021.

Journée organisée par Lucile Bordet, Muriel Cassel-Piccot, Nathalie Deley et Denis Jamet, Centre d’Études Linguistiques – Corpus, Discours et Sociétés et ELICO, Université de Lyon.

Soumission des propositions

Les propositions de communication devront être envoyées à Lucile Bordet, Muriel Cassel-Piccot et Denis Jamet à l’adresse cel@univ-lyon3.fr avant le 31 mai 2021.

Date de notification de la décision du comité scientifique : juillet 2021

Les propositions devront comporter 5000 signes maximum, hors références bibliographiques, avec 5 mots-clés, un titre, la mention de la langue de présentation, ainsi qu’une courte présentation de l’auteur ; elles devront clairement énoncer le cadre théorique, la méthodologie adoptée, et le corpus choisi. Chaque proposition fera l’objet d’une double évaluation à l’aveugle.

Langue étudiée : anglais, français
Langues du colloque : anglais, français
Durée des communications : 30 minutes de communication, 15 minutes de discussion
Publication : les communications retenues par le comité éditorial à l’issue de la journée d’étude pourront donner lieu à une publication dans un numéro spécial de ELAD-SILDA, la revue du CEL.

Cadrage

Les communications s’intéresseront donc aux pratiques discursives publicitaires sur le vieillissement et à destination ou non des seniors par le prisme des 3 problématiques principales ci-dessous (sans que cette liste soit exhaustive). Pourront être étudiées des campagnes de communication à visée marchande ou non marchande (comme des campagnes publiques de prévention ou de sensibilisation) :

Temporalités, sociétés et rhétorique

  • Étude diachronique de la représentation du vieillissement : différences et/ou continuités dans le temps ;
  • Étude comparative de la représentation du vieillissement dans des aires géographiques différentes : disparités et/ou similarités dans l’espace socio-économico-géographique et culturel ;
  • Étude comparative de la représentation du vieillissement dans les différents types de messages publicitaires : contrastes et/ou similarités selon les produits / services publicisés, le public visé, le medium utilisé.

Paradoxes et discordances

  • Discours publicitaires tenus sur la vieillesse et le vieillissement : reflets fidèles ou discordances, selon les émetteurs et les destinataires, le discours tenu, et les modalités de communication ; évolution des rôles sociaux lors du processus de vieillissement et les représentations dans le discours publicitaire ;
  • Paradoxes dans les représentations de la vieillesse et du vieillissement : vieillissement au carrefour du réalisme, de l’idéalisation et de la péjoration/dépréciation, refus de vieillir et vulnérabilité, détérioration vs conservation ;
  • Agisme vs jeunisme : discrimination, préjugés et perpétuation des croyances ; la vieillesse comme une menace ; tension entre maturité et jeunesse éternelle ; le “vieillir jeune“.

Idéologie et pouvoir

  • Vieillissement et enjeux de pouvoir : forces et faiblesses ; théorie et pratique ;
  • Enjeux idéologiques : façonnement de la représentation de la vieillesse et du vieillissement par le biais du discours publicitaire produit : la vieillesse conçue comme maladie, mythe de l’immortalité ou éternelle jeunesse, individualisme et dépendance ;
  • Les 50 ans et plus : stéréotypes, caricatures, conformités et diversités : discours institutionnel/gouvernemental et risque individuel et collectif, maîtrise du vieillissement, modèles identitaires et identité.

Les communications sont ouvertes à tous, chercheurs en linguistique, en sciences de l’information et de la communication, en sociologie, en psychologie sociale, etc. c’est-à-dire à tous les chercheurs qui travaillent sur les questions de l’influence sociale dans le champ marketing et se revendiquent d’une approche multimodale en analyse de discours. 

Texte de cadrage complet et informations pratiques ici : https://cel.univ-lyon3.fr/cel-journee-detude-la-%C2%AB-force-grise-%C2%BB-dans-les-discours-publicitaires-marchands-et-non-marchands-la-societe-face-a-ses-representations-du-vieillissement-1

AAC – coll. international « Linguistique contrastive », pour & avec J. Guillemin-Flescher, 9-10.06.2022, UPEC

Colloque international de linguistique contrastive

« Linguistique contrastive: bilan et perspectives en 2021. Colloque en l’honneur et en présence de Jacqueline Guillemin-Flescher »

10 et 11 juin 2021 reporté aux 9-10 juin 2022

Lieu : Université Paris-Est Créteil

Colloque co-organisé par l’Université Paris-Est Créteil (Françoise Doro-Mégy, Laboratoire IMAGER, équipeIDEAL) et l’Université Paris Nanterre (Agnès Leroux, LaboratoireCREA, équipeGREG).

Vous trouverez le texte de cadrage, ainsi que les dates et modalités de soumission, ici : Appel Coll LC JUIN 2021 diff listes

Date limite de propositions : 30 septembre  2021 reporté au 1er décembre 2021

Contacts : Françoise Doro-Mégy : francoise.doro-megy@u-pec.fr / Agnès Leroux : agleroux@parisnanterre.fr